TR

Saturday

Japanese Are Going "Hog Wild" Buying $19,000 Doomsday Shelters

North Korea’s latest ICBM test demonstrated once again that all of Japan is within striking range of the Kim Jong Un’s missiles, as it has been for a long time.
But it appears the North’s intensifying campaign of missile tests, which have increased dramatically in frequency since the beginning of the year, has convinced many wealthy Japanese that a nuclear confrontation could be imminent.


At least that’s what a surge in sales at one US-based builder of custom bunkers seems to suggest. The company, Atlas Survival Shelters, says the escalating tensions between President Donald Trump and North Korea have sparked a boom in sales, but not in the markets one might expect, according to Bloomberg.
“Business has never been better at Atlas Survival Shelters, which ships bunkers to customers around the world from its U.S. factories. Among the best sellers: the BombNado, with a starting price of $18,999.

The popularity of the company’s doomsday fortifications is no surprise, considering the state of the world in general and, specifically, Kim Jong-Un’s pursuit of a missile that can hit the continental U.S. Curiously, though, the most furious surge of interest isn’t in America but Japan, a country that’s long been within North Korea’s striking distance.

“Japan’s going hog wild right now,” said Ron Hubbard, owner of Atlas Survival. The Montebello, California-based company makes about a dozen different underground refuge models intended to be inhabitable for six months to a year, some outfitted with escape tunnels, decontamination rooms and bulletproof hatches.

While the Japanese have viewed North Korea as a menace for decades, the rogue regime’s July 4 launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile raised the level of alarm among preppers, as some people serious about emergency preparedness call themselves. Japan has its own small bunker-making sector, but the U.S., unique in its abundance of survivalist networks, is ground zero for get-ready-for-Armageddon businesses.”
Atlas isn’t the only one: Emergency shelter sales have soared since the beginning of the summer. One company, Rising S Co. of Murchison, Texas, said sales of its steel-clad products have doubled in the past three weeks, with Japanese buyers accounting for 80 percent of this demand.


At least that’s what a surge in sales at one US-based builder of custom bunkers seems to suggest. The company, Atlas Survival Shelters, says the escalating tensions between President Donald Trump and North Korea have sparked a boom in sales, but not in the markets one might expect, according to Bloomberg.
“Business has never been better at Atlas Survival Shelters, which ships bunkers to customers around the world from its U.S. factories. Among the best sellers: the BombNado, with a starting price of $18,999.

The popularity of the company’s doomsday fortifications is no surprise, considering the state of the world in general and, specifically, Kim Jong-Un’s pursuit of a missile that can hit the continental U.S. Curiously, though, the most furious surge of interest isn’t in America but Japan, a country that’s long been within North Korea’s striking distance.

“Japan’s going hog wild right now,” said Ron Hubbard, owner of Atlas Survival. The Montebello, California-based company makes about a dozen different underground refuge models intended to be inhabitable for six months to a year, some outfitted with escape tunnels, decontamination rooms and bulletproof hatches.

While the Japanese have viewed North Korea as a menace for decades, the rogue regime’s July 4 launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile raised the level of alarm among preppers, as some people serious about emergency preparedness call themselves. Japan has its own small bunker-making sector, but the U.S., unique in its abundance of survivalist networks, is ground zero for get-ready-for-Armageddon businesses.”
Atlas isn’t the only one: Emergency shelter sales have soared since the beginning of the summer. One company, Rising S Co. of Murchison, Texas, said sales of its steel-clad products have doubled in the past three weeks, with Japanese buyers accounting for 80 percent of this demand.   
Read more.....

1 comment:

Kismet said...

If you survive, you may no want what's left.